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image: Food for Thought

Food for Thought

By | June 1, 2012

Plant research remains grossly underfunded, despite the demand for increased crop production to support a growing population.

6 Comments

image: Grading on the Curve

Grading on the Curve

By | June 1, 2012

Actin filaments respond to pressure by forming branches at their curviest spots, helping resist the push.

5 Comments

image: Growing Human Eggs

Growing Human Eggs

By | June 1, 2012

Germline stem cells discovered in human ovaries can be cultured into fresh eggs.

0 Comments

image: Obama to Weigh Open Access

Obama to Weigh Open Access

By | May 24, 2012

A petition asking for online, readable publication of all government-funded research is making its way to the White House.

0 Comments

image: Money for Team Research

Money for Team Research

By | May 9, 2012

The University of Michigan is funding exploratory ideas that cross disciplinary boundaries with $20,000 a pop.

2 Comments

image: Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

Doubled Gene Boosted Brain Power

By | May 7, 2012

Human-specific duplications of a gene involved in brain development may have contributed to our species’ unique intelligence.

6 Comments

image: The Satellite Shortage

The Satellite Shortage

By | May 4, 2012

Aging satellites and NASA funding cuts threaten to put a serious dent in scientists’ ability to observe Earth’s processes from above.

0 Comments

image: Stem Cell Suicide Switch

Stem Cell Suicide Switch

By | May 3, 2012

Human embryonic stem cells swiftly kill themselves in response to DNA damage.

10 Comments

image: More Research Money for MDs

More Research Money for MDs

By | May 1, 2012

Principal investigators with medical training have a slightly higher NIH funding rate than those with just a PhD.

6 Comments

image: The Sugar Lnc

The Sugar Lnc

By | May 1, 2012

Genes that react to cellular sugar content are regulated by a long non-coding RNA via an unexpected mechanism

2 Comments

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