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The Scientist

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image: More Transparency in IRB-Industry Ties

More Transparency in IRB-Industry Ties

By | July 13, 2015

Conflicts of interest among institutional review board members are disclosed more often than they were a decade ago, according to a survey of academics.

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image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

8 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: The Cost of Irreproducible Research

The Cost of Irreproducible Research

By | June 10, 2015

Half of basic science studies cannot be replicated, according to a new analysis—to the tune of $28 billion a year in the U.S.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Follow the Funding

Follow the Funding

By | May 1, 2015

In times of budget belt-tightening at the federal level, life-science researchers can keep their work supported through private sources.  

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image: Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

By | April 23, 2015

Scientists who evaluate National Institutes of Health grant applications often identify the projects that will have the biggest scientific impact, according to an analysis.

10 Comments

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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