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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Science Exchange Raises $25M

Science Exchange Raises $25M

By | March 24, 2016

With fresh funding, the experiment-services and independent-validation startup will expand its staff.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

NIH Grant Reviews Don’t Predict Success

By | February 18, 2016

Peer reviewers’ assessments of funding proposals to the National Institutes of Health don’t correlate well with later publication citations, a study shows.

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image: Funding Ban for Plant Biologist

Funding Ban for Plant Biologist

By | January 26, 2016

Olivier Voinnet, who has corrected and retracted several papers, cannot receive Swiss government grants for three years.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: Following the Funding

Following the Funding

By | November 4, 2015

Researchers use network theory to estimate the importance of relationships among researchers and institutions in attracting grant money.

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