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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Mr. Epigenetics

Mr. Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Meet Wolf Reik, August Profilee and Babraham Institute director of research.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

1 Comment

image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

1 Comment

image: More Transparency in IRB-Industry Ties

More Transparency in IRB-Industry Ties

By | July 13, 2015

Conflicts of interest among institutional review board members are disclosed more often than they were a decade ago, according to a survey of academics.

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image: Staying Active in the Lab

Staying Active in the Lab

By | July 1, 2015

Retiring as a professor, and even shutting down your own lab, doesn’t necessarily mean quitting research.

8 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: The Cost of Irreproducible Research

The Cost of Irreproducible Research

By | June 10, 2015

Half of basic science studies cannot be replicated, according to a new analysis—to the tune of $28 billion a year in the U.S.

5 Comments

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Follow the Funding

Follow the Funding

By | May 1, 2015

In times of budget belt-tightening at the federal level, life-science researchers can keep their work supported through private sources.  

9 Comments

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