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NASA researchers have discovered ancient microbes locked inside minerals, suggesting a possible niche for interstellar life.

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image: Image of the Day: Busy Bees

Image of the Day: Busy Bees

By | February 21, 2017

Worker bumblebees vary in how efficiently they bring pollen and nectar back to the hive—the most active foragers can make up to 40 times more trips than the least active ones.

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image: Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

Toward Killing Cancer with Bacteria

By | February 8, 2017

Researchers employ an engineered microbe to destroy tumor cells in mice.

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image: Discovering Novel Antibiotics

Discovering Novel Antibiotics

By | February 1, 2017

Three methods identify and activate silent bacterial gene clusters to uncover new drugs

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image: The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

The Fungus that Poses as a Flower

By | February 1, 2017

Mummy berry disease coats blueberry leaves with sweet, sticky stains that smell like flowers, luring in passing insects to spread fungal spores.

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image: Analysis: Industry-Funded Honeybee Study Was “Misleading”

Analysis: Industry-Funded Honeybee Study Was “Misleading”

By | January 24, 2017

Statisticians debunk a 2013 study by scientists at a Swiss agrochemical company, which had reported that a neonicotinoid pesticide posed a low risk to honeybees.  

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Study of 81 six-week-olds who were born by C-section or vaginal delivery didn’t show differences in the structure or function of their microbiota, despite contrary results from other studies on babies. 

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image: How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

How Plant-Soil Feedback Affects Ecological Diversity

By | January 13, 2017

Researchers examine how underground microbes and nutrients affect plant populations.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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