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image: Singing In the Brain

Singing In the Brain

By | March 1, 2017

His first love was dance, but Erich Jarvis has long courted another love—understanding how the brain learns vocalization.

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image: Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

Understanding the Roots of Human Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Researchers are using multiple methods to study the origins of humans’ capacity to process and produce music, and there’s no shortage of debate about the results.

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image: Infographic: Mapping Musicality

Infographic: Mapping Musicality

By | March 1, 2017

Huge areas of the brain respond to any sort of auditory stimulus, making it difficult for scientists to nail down regions that are important for music processing.

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image: Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

Infographic: Taking Note of Singing Errors

By | March 1, 2017

Birds' brains respond to distorted songs with changes in dopamine signaling.

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image: Meeting BRAMS

Meeting BRAMS

By | March 1, 2017

Visit the International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research, located in Montreal, to see the research seeking to decipher humans’ relationship to music.

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The 23-year-old neuroscience graduate student, born in Saudi Arabia and raised in numerous countries, came to the U.S. as a teenager to attend college.

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image: Image of the Day: Brainy Bees

Image of the Day: Brainy Bees

By | February 24, 2017

Bees can learn complex behaviors to obtain rewards.

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image: Spinal Cord Injury Researcher Dies

Spinal Cord Injury Researcher Dies

By | February 23, 2017

Neuroscientist Geoffrey Raisman pioneered the study of spinal cord injury and the use of cell transplants to repair the damage.

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image: ADHD Linked to Structural Differences in the Brain

ADHD Linked to Structural Differences in the Brain

By | February 21, 2017

Imaging data show smaller volumes in several brain regions among people diagnosed with the behavioral disorder.

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image: Image of the Day: Busy Bees

Image of the Day: Busy Bees

By | February 21, 2017

Worker bumblebees vary in how efficiently they bring pollen and nectar back to the hive—the most active foragers can make up to 40 times more trips than the least active ones.

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