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image: Image of the Day: Linked Out

Image of the Day: Linked Out

By | January 26, 2017

A study provides the first visual evidence that cytofilaments tunnel through a cell’s nucleus to the extracellular matrix.

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image: Analysis: Industry-Funded Honeybee Study Was “Misleading”

Analysis: Industry-Funded Honeybee Study Was “Misleading”

By | January 24, 2017

Statisticians debunk a 2013 study by scientists at a Swiss agrochemical company, which had reported that a neonicotinoid pesticide posed a low risk to honeybees.  

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image: Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

Lipids Take the Lead in Metastasis

By | January 20, 2017

Researchers find diverse ways that the molecules can regulate cancer’s spread.

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image: Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

By | January 19, 2017

Metagenomic sequence data boosts the power of protein modeling software to yield hundreds of new protein structure predictions.

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image: Replication Complications

Replication Complications

By | January 18, 2017

An initiative to replicate key findings in cancer biology yields a preliminary conclusion: it’s difficult.

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Clostridium botulinum produces a transcription factor that can aggregate and self-propagate a prion-like form, leading to genome-wide changes in gene expression in E. coli, according to a study.

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image: First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

First Bumblebee Species Declared Endangered in U.S.

By | January 11, 2017

The federal government concludes the rusty patched bumblebee is nearing extinction.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

How an Invasive Bee Managed to Thrive in Australia

By | January 1, 2017

The Asian honeybee should have been crippled by low genetic diversity, but thanks to natural selection it thrived.

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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