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The Scientist

» bees and developmental biology

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

1 Comment

image: Parasite-Pathogen Partnership

Parasite-Pathogen Partnership

By | March 7, 2016

Parasitic mites that transmit a honey bee-infecting virus may benefit from spreading the pathogen, a study shows.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

Bee Semen Can Protect Queens from an STD

By | January 22, 2016

Honeybee seminal fluid contains two different components that fight Nosema fungus.

3 Comments

image: US Wild Bee Populations Waning

US Wild Bee Populations Waning

By | December 23, 2015

Study shows declines in bee abundance where pollination services are increasingly in demand.

1 Comment

image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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