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image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.


image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.


image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.


image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity


image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.


image: Mobile Microscopes

Mobile Microscopes

By | June 1, 2013

Turning cell phones into basic research tools can improve health care in the developing world.


image: Oral History

Oral History

By | June 1, 2013

Researchers use DNA from ancient tooth tartar to chart changes in the bacterial communities that have lived in human mouths for 8,000 years.

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image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.


Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.


image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


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