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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: Capturing Crawling Cells

Capturing Crawling Cells

By | December 5, 2012

The methodology behind an experiment that used the Oris Pro Cell Migration Assay to track the travels of cancer cells.

1 Comment

image: Marlboro Chicks

Marlboro Chicks

By | December 5, 2012

Two species of songbirds pack their nests with scavenged cigarette butts that repel irksome parasites.

1 Comment

image: 2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

2012 Top 10 Innovations - Honorable Mentions

By | December 4, 2012

These new products didn't quite breech the top 10 this year, but attracted the attention of our panel of expert judges nonetheless.

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Contributors

By | December 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the December 2012 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Coughing Seashells

Coughing Seashells

By | November 28, 2012

A type of scallop expels water and waste through a sort of cough that could reveal clues about water quality.

1 Comment

image: Beetles Warm BC Forests

Beetles Warm BC Forests

By | November 27, 2012

Using satellite data, researchers calculate that mountain pine beetle infestations raise summertime temperatures in British Columbia’s pine forests by 1 degree Celsius.

3 Comments

image: Old New Species

Old New Species

By | November 20, 2012

Decades can pass between the discovery of a new animal or plant and its official debut in the scientific literature.

4 Comments

image: No Sex Required

No Sex Required

By | November 19, 2012

An all-female species, distantly related to flatworms, steals all of genetic material it needs to diversify its genome.

2 Comments

image: Dolled-Up Turtles

Dolled-Up Turtles

By | November 1, 2012

Borrowing techniques from nail and hair salons, researchers have devised a method to tag small, previously untrackable sea turtles.

2 Comments

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