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image: Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

Dengue Infection Impairs Immune Defense Against Zika

By | August 18, 2017

A memory B cell response to Zika virus in dengue-infected patients produced antibodies that were poorly neutralizing in vitro and instead enhanced infection.

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image: Zika Linked to More Neurological Problems in Adults

Zika Linked to More Neurological Problems in Adults

By | August 14, 2017

A review of several dozen hospitalized patients in Brazil finds neurological conditions, including inflammation of the brain and spinal cord, in addition to Guillain-Barre syndrome.

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image: Pregnant Women Absent from Zika Vaccine Trials

Pregnant Women Absent from Zika Vaccine Trials

By | August 14, 2017

Some vaccine developers are taking steps to include them, in line with bioethicists' urging, but it will likely take years before any expectant mothers are enrolled.

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

By | May 25, 2017

DNA sequencing reveals that the virus responsible for the recent outbreak in the Americas originated in Brazil in 2014 and circulated undetected for months before the first cases were reported.

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image: A Triple Threat

A Triple Threat

By | May 22, 2017

The mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.

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image: Zika's Economic Burden

Zika's Economic Burden

By | May 11, 2017

A new analysis estimates that the viral disease could cost between $183 million and more than $10 billion in the U.S. alone. 

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: <em>Wolbachia</em>-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

Wolbachia-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

By | April 19, 2017

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

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