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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

Tracing Zika’s Spread Through Genetics

By | May 25, 2017

DNA sequencing reveals that the virus responsible for the recent outbreak in the Americas originated in Brazil in 2014 and circulated undetected for months before the first cases were reported.

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image: A Triple Threat

A Triple Threat

By | May 22, 2017

The mosquitoes that carry Zika may be able to transmit two other viruses at the same time.

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image: Zika's Economic Burden

Zika's Economic Burden

By | May 11, 2017

A new analysis estimates that the viral disease could cost between $183 million and more than $10 billion in the U.S. alone. 

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: <em>Wolbachia</em>-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

Wolbachia-infected Mosquitoes Released in Florida

By | April 19, 2017

The bacterium causes eggs to die, and spreading treated insects is expected to curb Aedes aegypti populations.

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image: CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

CRISPR-Based Nucleic Acid Test Debuts

By | April 13, 2017

SHERLOCK combines CRISPR-Cas13a with isothermal RNA amplification to detect RNA and DNA with single-base specificity.

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image: Keeping the Blood Supply Zika-Free

Keeping the Blood Supply Zika-Free

By | April 7, 2017

Blood donation centers across the U.S. are required to screen samples for signs of the mosquito-borne virus. Some have questioned whether it’s always necessary.

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Infants born to mothers who were infected with the virus during pregnancy—including babies who do not show signs of microcephaly—may experience other birth defects.

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