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image: Lab Size Study Stirs Debate

Lab Size Study Stirs Debate

By | February 9, 2015

Do bigger labs churn out more high-impact papers? Not necessarily, according to a new analysis.

3 Comments

image: On “Geniuses” and Gender Gaps

On “Geniuses” and Gender Gaps

By | January 19, 2015

Perceptions of a need for brilliance to excel in a field of study may contribute to its relatively low numbers of women, researchers report.

4 Comments

image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

8 Comments

image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: The End of Science Sexism?

The End of Science Sexism?

By | November 5, 2014

A study suggests that, at least in US academia, men and women now receive roughly equivalent treatment in the workplace. The scientific community disagrees.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: Keeping Up with IP

Keeping Up with IP

By | September 1, 2014

It’s never too early to start thinking about intellectual property rights—even for biologists doing basic research.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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