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» DNA sequencing and microbiology

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image: Live Wires

Live Wires

By | May 1, 2013

Discoveries of microbial communities that transfer electrons between cells and across relatively long distances are launching a new field of microbiology.

2 Comments

image: Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

Autism-Lyme Correlation Debunked

By | April 30, 2013

Researchers find zero evidence for Lyme-induced autism.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: April 22–26

Week in Review: April 22–26

By | April 26, 2013

Double helix celebrates 60; detecting calories without taste; bacteria vs. tumor; perceptual consciousness in babies

0 Comments

image: Virus Versus Bacteria

Virus Versus Bacteria

By | April 17, 2013

A newly developed drug, modeled after a bacteria-infecting virus, is less likely to become antibiotic resistant.

1 Comment

image: Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

By | April 15, 2013

Today’s tulip trees carry similar mitochondrial DNA as those that grew in the time of the dinosaurs.

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image: Sequencing Cancer

Sequencing Cancer

By | April 9, 2013

This month’s AACR attendees, including National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus, discuss new approaches to cancer research using whole genome sequencing.

1 Comment

image: Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

By | April 1, 2013

Professor, Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology. Age: 40

0 Comments

image: Week in Review: March 25-29

Week in Review: March 25-29

By | March 29, 2013

Microbes affect weight loss; dozens of cancer-linked genes identified; a climate change scientists speaks out about personal attacks; isolation among elderly linked to death

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image: Microbes Affect Weight Loss

Microbes Affect Weight Loss

By | March 27, 2013

Microbial changes in the gut contribute to a patient’s ability to slim down after gastric bypass surgery.

3 Comments

image: Revealing Genetic Risks

Revealing Genetic Risks

By | March 22, 2013

Genetics experts argue that patients should be told about dangerous variants in their DNA that show up incidentally during sequencing.

1 Comment

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