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» DNA sequencing, neuroscience and ecology

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image: Ancient Moss Reincarnated

Ancient Moss Reincarnated

By | March 18, 2014

Antarctic moss beds that have been frozen for more than 1,500 years yield plants that can be brought back to life in the lab.

1 Comment

image: Music on the Mind

Music on the Mind

By | March 13, 2014

Three new studies delve into humans’ creation and perception of music.

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image: Seeing with Sound

Seeing with Sound

By | March 10, 2014

Converting sights to sounds reveals that the brains of congenitally blind people respond similarly to various objects as those of subjects who can see.

1 Comment

image: Biomarkers Predict Future Cognitive Impairment

Biomarkers Predict Future Cognitive Impairment

By | March 9, 2014

A blood test can predict whether an asymptomatic older adult will develop cognitive impairment or Alzheimer’s disease within two to three years, a study shows.

5 Comments

image: Venter's New Venture

Venter's New Venture

By | March 5, 2014

The genomics pioneer is starting a new company that aims to tackle the mysteries of human aging.

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image: More Mutations in Girls with Autism

More Mutations in Girls with Autism

By | March 4, 2014

A greater number of genetic mutations among autistic girls, compared to their male counterparts, suggests that the female brain can better handle such variations.  

1 Comment

image: Air Traffic

Air Traffic

By | March 1, 2014

Scientists use DNA sequencing to identify what’s attracting birds to airports, where midair collisions with planes can be devastating.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

1 Comment

image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

1 Comment

image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.

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