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» DNA sequencing, neuroscience and evolution

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image: Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

Opinion: Can the Brain Be Trained?

By | March 23, 2015

Online brain-training is gaining popularity, but so far little evidence exists to support claims of improved cognition.

5 Comments

image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

Stimulating Neurons with Light and Gold

By | March 12, 2015

Researchers develop a technique to trigger neural activity in culture using light to heat gold nanoparticles.

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image: Human Brain Project Reviewed

Human Brain Project Reviewed

By | March 10, 2015

After weathering serious criticism last year, the European Commission–backed effort to map the brain’s neural connections must reform or die, a review panel says.

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image: Modifying Memories During Sleep

Modifying Memories During Sleep

By | March 9, 2015

Researchers create a link between a location and a reward in sleeping mice.

2 Comments

image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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image: A Deathly Pallor

A Deathly Pallor

By | March 1, 2015

Global warming could lead to lighter-colored insects with waning immune defenses.

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image: As the Brain Ages

As the Brain Ages

By | March 1, 2015

See human brains age in week-by-week time lapse images that divulge the existence of tiny strokes that damage white matter.

2 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

1 Comment

image: Drunk Monkeys

Drunk Monkeys

By | March 1, 2015

UC Berkeley biologist Robert Dudley explains his "drunken monkey" hypothesis for how humans developed a taste for alcohol.

0 Comments

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