The Scientist

» DNA sequencing, immunology and microbiology

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: New Immunity

New Immunity

By | June 1, 2015

A scaffolding protein forms the hub of a newly identified immune pathway in plants.

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image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

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image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

2 Comments

image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 21, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

Model Predicts Zoonotic Hot Spots

By | May 19, 2015

The midwestern U.S. and central Asia are at high risk for new disease outbreaks from pathogen-bearing rodents, according to a study.

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image: Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

Maturation of the Infant Microbiome

By | May 13, 2015

Gut microbial communities from breastfed babies are slow to resemble adults’ microbiota.

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image: Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

Measles Vax’s Off-Target Effects

By | May 11, 2015

Researchers find evidence that measles vaccines reduced deaths from other infectious diseases due to “immune amnesia.”

2 Comments

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