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» DNA sequencing, immunology and microbiology

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Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.


image: Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

Arctic Bacteria Thrives at Mars Temps

By | May 23, 2013

Researchers discover a microbe living at -15°C, the coldest temperature ever reported for bacterial growth, giving hope to the search for life elsewhere in the cosmos.


image: Macrophages Drive Regeneration

Macrophages Drive Regeneration

By | May 22, 2013

The activity of one type of immune cell helps regrow the limbs of amputated salamanders.


image: Viruses Prefer the Cold

Viruses Prefer the Cold

By | May 20, 2013

Chilly weather could impede the immune reactions that most effectively contain viruses like the common cold.  


image: Protective Phages

Protective Phages

By | May 20, 2013

Viruses that attack bacteria may be an important component of our gut microbiota.


image: New Guardians Against Diabetes?

New Guardians Against Diabetes?

By | May 20, 2013

A new class of immune cell could protect against type 1 diabetes by suppressing other immune cells.

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image: Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

Decoding Bacterial Methylomes

By | May 15, 2013

A new technique could soon spur unprecedented insight into the role of bacterial epigenetics in the evolution of pathogen virulence.

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image: Probing the Genetics of Intelligence

Probing the Genetics of Intelligence

By | May 15, 2013

Some geneticists are skeptical of a project that will analyze the DNA of high-IQ individuals to identify genetic variants related to intelligence.


image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes


image: Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

By | May 8, 2013

Genetic material recovered from sediment beneath the sea floor reveals ancient species not contained in the fossil record and could shed light on climate change.


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