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image: DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic

DNA Sequencing: From Tedious to Automatic

By | October 1, 2016

Sequencing has gone from a laborious manual task costing thousands of dollars to a quick and cheap practice that is standard for many laboratories.

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | September 7, 2016

Virus’s genome to aid in diagnoses; bees caught in crossfire of mosquito sprays; Zika spreads in Asia; US Congress revisits Zika funding

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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

What Sensory Receptors Do Outside of Sense Organs

By | September 1, 2016

Odor, taste, and light receptors are present in many different parts of the body, and they have surprisingly diverse functions.

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