The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and culture

Most Recent

image: Bacterial Gene Transfer Gets Sexier

Bacterial Gene Transfer Gets Sexier

By | July 9, 2013

Mycobacterium smegmatis can donate larger portions of its genome to other bacteria than previously thought, approaching the level of gene shuffling seen in sexual reproduction.

1 Comment

image: Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

Antarctic Lake Teems With Life

By | July 8, 2013

DNA and RNA sequences from Lake Vostok below the Antarctic glacier reveal thousands of bacteria species, including some commonly found in fish digestive systems.

1 Comment

In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

0 Comments

image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 24, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: The Art of Science

The Art of Science

By | June 21, 2013

Princeton scientists and engineers create a stunning collection of scientific images better suited for a gallery than a lab meeting.

2 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | June 19, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Going International

Opinion: Going International

By and | June 10, 2013

US universities need to reach across their own borders to retain global scientific preeminence.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

Opinion: The Dilemma of Diversity

By | June 10, 2013

The NIH remains a Caucasian-dominated workforce. Why haven’t the agency’s efforts to diversify been successful?

3 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Male Fish Borrows Egg to Clone Itself
  2. How to Tell a Person’s “Brain Age”
  3. Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked
    The Nutshell Life Science Funding Cuts Leaked

    According to a document posted online less than a day before the release of the official 2018 budget proposal, the National Institutes of Health could face even deeper cuts than previously suggested by the Trump administration.

  4. Cooking Up Cancer?
    Notebook Cooking Up Cancer?

    Overcooked potatoes and burnt toast contain acrylamide, a potential carcinogen that researchers have struggled to reliably link to human cancers.

AAAS