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» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

3 Comments

image: Royal Remains Confirmed

Royal Remains Confirmed

By | December 3, 2014

Bones unearthed in 2012 are likely those of King Richard III, a new DNA analysis shows.

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image: Top 10 Innovations 2014

Top 10 Innovations 2014

By | December 1, 2014

The list of the year’s best new products contains both perennial winners and innovative newcomers.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Ocular Microbiome

The Ocular Microbiome

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: 2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

2014 Top 10 Innovations: Last Chance to Submit

By | September 15, 2014

The Scientist’s annual search for the best and brightest life science innovations is drawing to a close. Submit your new product or methodology today for a chance to win!

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image: Jewish Heritage Written in DNA

Jewish Heritage Written in DNA

By | September 9, 2014

Fully sequenced genomes of more than 100 Ashkenazi people clarify the group’s history and provide a reference for researchers and physicians trying to pinpoint disease-associated genes.

5 Comments

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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