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The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

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image: Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

By | March 18, 2013

Next-generation sequencing diagnostics are already being used, and patients are ready.

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image: Life in Lake Vostok?

Life in Lake Vostok?

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers analyzing samples from Antarctic subglacial lake confirm they have found unknown bacteria, and claim the microbes come from the lake rather than contaminants.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Bigfoot DNA is Bunk

Bigfoot DNA is Bunk

By | February 15, 2013

The group that last year claimed to have sequenced the Sasquatch genome has finally published its data in a brand new “journal,” and geneticists are not impressed.  

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image: Genetic Privacy for Suspects?

Genetic Privacy for Suspects?

By | February 12, 2013

In an upcoming hearing, the US Supreme Court will decide on whether police can take DNA samples from suspects who have not been convicted.

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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image: Solitary Sequencing

Solitary Sequencing

By | December 21, 2012

Decoding the genome of a single cell could reveal previously overlooked levels of genetic variation.

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