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» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

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image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

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image: Isolating Genomes from the Masses

Isolating Genomes from the Masses

By | February 6, 2012

Researchers find a way to determine the sequence of a single species from metagenomics data of entire microbial communities.

12 Comments

image: Iron Builds a Better Brain

Iron Builds a Better Brain

By | January 9, 2012

Brain imaging and gene analyses in twins reveal that white matter integrity is linked to an iron homeostasis gene.

9 Comments

image: High-Tech Choir Master

High-Tech Choir Master

By | January 1, 2012

Elaine Mardis can make DNA sequencers sing, generating genome data that shed light on evolution and disease.

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image: In with the New

In with the New

By | January 1, 2012

There is definitely no shortage of technological innovation in the life sciences.

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image: Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

Lynne-Marie Postovit: Cancer Modeler

By | January 1, 2012

Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario. Age: 34

3 Comments

image: Video Gamers Help Solve Disease

Video Gamers Help Solve Disease

By | December 20, 2011

The collective intelligence of thousands of video game players is helping researchers understand the regulation of more than 500 different disease genes.

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image: $400M for Personalized Medicine

$400M for Personalized Medicine

By | December 8, 2011

The National Institutes of Health promises about $400 million to help get personalized genetics into the clinic.

3 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

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