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image: 23andMe Now Facing Lawsuit

23andMe Now Facing Lawsuit

By | December 4, 2013

Shortly after getting in trouble with the Food and Drug Administration, the personal genetic testing company is slapped with a class action lawsuit.

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image: Mapping NYC's Microbes

Mapping NYC's Microbes

By | December 1, 2013

New York University’s Jane Carlton talks about a project designed to characterize the microbiome of the Big Apple.

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image: Metropolome

Metropolome

By | December 1, 2013

Researchers take advantage of rapid and cheap DNA sequencing technologies to map the bacterial microbiome of New York City.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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image: Opinion: Standards Needed

Opinion: Standards Needed

By | September 18, 2013

The success of genome sequencing hinges on technology standardization and coordinated efforts among scientists, bioinformaticians, and physicians.

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image: The Price of DNA IDs

The Price of DNA IDs

By | September 16, 2013

Following natural disasters or violent political turmoil, DNA science can help identify victims. But what if a country can’t afford the technology?

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image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

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image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

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