The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 1, 2013

Satellites of the Golgi apparatus generate the microtubules used to grow outer dendrite branches in Drosophila neurons.

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image: Pluripotent Until Needed

Pluripotent Until Needed

By | April 1, 2013

Microarrays help keep induced pluripotent stem cell lines in check, from start to finish.

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image: Smurf-y Old Age

Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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image: Revealing Genetic Risks

Revealing Genetic Risks

By | March 22, 2013

Genetics experts argue that patients should be told about dangerous variants in their DNA that show up incidentally during sequencing.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 19, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

Opinion: Genomics in the Clinic

By | March 18, 2013

Next-generation sequencing diagnostics are already being used, and patients are ready.

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image: Life in Lake Vostok?

Life in Lake Vostok?

By | March 13, 2013

Researchers analyzing samples from Antarctic subglacial lake confirm they have found unknown bacteria, and claim the microbes come from the lake rather than contaminants.

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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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