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image: US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

US Government to Repatriate Kennewick Man

By | April 29, 2016

A 2015 ancient DNA study determined that the 8,500-year-old skeletal remains belonged to an individual of Native American ancestry. Now, the US Army Corp of Engineers has begun the process of returning the bones to their rightful owners.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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Their $1.5 billion bid, which topped Thermo Fisher Scientific’s $1.3 billion offer for the genetic analysis company, was rejected.

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image: Spoiler Alert

Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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image: Nanopore Sequencing Lawsuit

Nanopore Sequencing Lawsuit

By | February 29, 2016

Illumina accuses Oxford Nanopore Technologies of developing nanopore-based sequencing strategies covered by its patents.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Ancient Irish

Ancient Irish

By | December 30, 2015

The genomes of a 5,200-year-old woman and three 4,000-year-old men yield clues about the founding of Celtic populations.

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image: Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

Year in Review: Spotlight on Ancient DNA

By | December 30, 2015

Several studies using centuries-old genetic material graced the pages of life-science journals in 2015. Here’s a look at a few of the researchers and papers that made headlines this year.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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