The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Telltale Tusks

Telltale Tusks

By | June 22, 2015

Sequencing DNA from ivory may be useful for tracking down elephant poachers.

0 Comments

image: Kennewick Man Was Native American

Kennewick Man Was Native American

By | June 18, 2015

Genomic analysis suggests that the skeleton’s closest living relatives are Native American after all.

3 Comments

image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

0 Comments

image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

1 Comment

image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

0 Comments

image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

2 Comments

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 21, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

1 Comment

image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

0 Comments

image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

1 Comment

image: Cancer Sequencing Controls

Cancer Sequencing Controls

By | April 15, 2015

Comparing a patient’s tumor DNA sequence with that of her normal tissue can improve researchers’ identification of disease-associated mutations.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR
    The Nutshell Monsanto Buys Rights to CRISPR

    The US agribusiness secures a global, nonexclusive licensing agreement from the Broad Institute to use the gene-editing technology for agricultural applications.

  2. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  3. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  4. ESP on Trial
    Foundations ESP on Trial

    In the 1930s, parapsychologist Joseph Banks Rhine aimed to use scientific methods to confirm the existence of extrasensory perception, but faced criticisms of dubious analyses and irreproducible results.

RayBiotech