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» DNA sequencing and developmental biology

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image: Jewish Heritage Written in DNA

Jewish Heritage Written in DNA

By | September 9, 2014

Fully sequenced genomes of more than 100 Ashkenazi people clarify the group’s history and provide a reference for researchers and physicians trying to pinpoint disease-associated genes.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Metagenomics Mash-Up

Metagenomics Mash-Up

By | August 1, 2014

A tour of the newest software and strategies for analyzing microbial and viral communities

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image: Sequencing at Sea

Sequencing at Sea

By | August 1, 2014

Watch University of Florida biologist Leonid Moroz describe his novel approach aboard his floating genome sequencing lab.

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image: Sequencing on the Seven Seas

Sequencing on the Seven Seas

By | August 1, 2014

Researchers have installed an advanced genomics lab facility aboard a boat to create a floating molecular testing facility for marine life sciences

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Visualizing the Ocular Microbiome

Visualizing the Ocular Microbiome

By | May 12, 2014

Researchers are beginning to study in depth the largely uncharted territory of the eye’s microbial composition.

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image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

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