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image: Opinion: Standards Needed

Opinion: Standards Needed

By | September 18, 2013

The success of genome sequencing hinges on technology standardization and coordinated efforts among scientists, bioinformaticians, and physicians.

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image: The Price of DNA IDs

The Price of DNA IDs

By | September 16, 2013

Following natural disasters or violent political turmoil, DNA science can help identify victims. But what if a country can’t afford the technology?

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

Bacteriophages shuttle genes between diverse ecosystems.

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image: Out of Sync

Out of Sync

By | September 1, 2013

Why eating at the wrong times is tied to such profound and negative effects on our bodies

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image: Remaking a Classic

Remaking a Classic

By | September 1, 2013

Companies are bursting at the seams with tools to engineer pharma’s next magic bullet: the new and improved antibody.

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image: You Are <em>When</em> You Eat

You Are When You Eat

By | September 1, 2013

Circadian time zones and metabolism

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image: Mind the Clock

Mind the Clock

By | September 1, 2013

Many of the body's tissues can tell time, and these peripheral clocks can be influenced by environmental cues, such as the timing of food consumption.

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image: Going Viral

Going Viral

By | September 1, 2013

From therapeutics to gene transfer, bacteriophages offer a sustainable and powerful method of controlling microbes.

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image: Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

Why One Cream Cake Leads to Another

By | August 15, 2013

Continuously eating fatty foods perturbs communication between the gut and brain, which in turn perpetuates a bad diet.

8 Comments

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