The Scientist

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image: A Dime a Dozen

A Dime a Dozen

By | January 1, 2013

Affordable diagnostic tests tackle the world’s most pressing health problems.

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image: Fighting Microbes with Microbes

Fighting Microbes with Microbes

By | January 1, 2013

Doctors turn to good microbes to fight disease. Will the same strategy work with crops?

6 Comments

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Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

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Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

1 Comment

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Limber LIMS

By | January 1, 2013

Using laboratory information management systems (LIMS) to automate and streamline laboratory tasks: three case studies

1 Comment

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Solitary Sequencing

By | December 21, 2012

Decoding the genome of a single cell could reveal previously overlooked levels of genetic variation.

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2012 Multimedia Roundup

By | December 14, 2012

The science images and videos that captured our attention in 2012

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image: Old Ocean Mold

Old Ocean Mold

By | December 12, 2012

Fungi in 100 million year-old seafloor sediments could possess novel antibiotics.

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image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

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