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» DNA sequencing, disease/medicine and ecology

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image: Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

Fat Hormone Controls Diabetes

By | May 8, 2013

A small protein produced by fat cells appears to regulate blood sugar levels, potentially revealing a new way to treat diabetes.

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image: Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

Easy Jump for H5N1 from Bird to Mammal

By | May 2, 2013

Hybrid viruses derived from an H5N1 bird flu strain can infect guinea pigs through the air.

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image: BRET Meets FRET

BRET Meets FRET

By | May 1, 2013

Scientists create biocompatible, self-luminescing nanoparticles for in vivo imaging.

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image: Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

Virus Latency Causes Cattle Disease?

By | April 29, 2013

Researchers identify a herpesvirus gene persisting in the cells of calves suffering from malignant catarrhal disease.

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image: Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

By | April 24, 2013

Researchers in the Amazon are measuring how much carbon dioxide fertilizes the rainforest.

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image: Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

Tumors Fall to Radioactive Bacteria

By | April 22, 2013

Researchers use bacteria to deliver radiation to shrink pancreatic tumors in mice.

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image: Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

By | April 15, 2013

Today’s tulip trees carry similar mitochondrial DNA as those that grew in the time of the dinosaurs.

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image: Sequencing Cancer

Sequencing Cancer

By | April 9, 2013

This month’s AACR attendees, including National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus, discuss new approaches to cancer research using whole genome sequencing.

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image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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image: “Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

“Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

By | April 5, 2013

Researchers can identify individuals by the unique chemical signatures in their breath, suggesting that exhalations could be used for metabolomic tests.

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