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image: A Dime a Dozen

A Dime a Dozen

By | January 1, 2013

Affordable diagnostic tests tackle the world’s most pressing health problems.

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Games for Science

By | January 1, 2013

Scientists are using video games to tap the collective intelligence of people around the world, while doctors and educators are turning to games to treat and teach.

7 Comments

image: Genomics-Informed Pathology

Genomics-Informed Pathology

By | January 1, 2013

Twenty-first century lab reports will include test results read by a new breed of pathologist.

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image: Solitary Sequencing

Solitary Sequencing

By | December 21, 2012

Decoding the genome of a single cell could reveal previously overlooked levels of genetic variation.

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image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.

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image: Maggot Medicine

Maggot Medicine

By | December 10, 2012

The healing powers of maggots may lie in their secreted proteins, which restrain the human immune response.

2 Comments

image: Drug Approvals Up

Drug Approvals Up

By | December 7, 2012

The total number of new drugs approved this year ties last year for the highest since 2004, suggesting that the pharmaceutical industry is recovering.  

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image: Feds Scrutinize Genomics Merger

Feds Scrutinize Genomics Merger

By | December 6, 2012

A Chinese biotech company is angling to buy California-based Complete Genomics, but federal regulators are expressing security concerns and may scuttle the deal.

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image: Hurry Up, FDA

Hurry Up, FDA

By | December 6, 2012

The US Food and Drug Administration is taking steps to get new devices on the market sooner—and antibiotics may be next.

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image: MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

MicroRNAs Repair Heart Cells

By | December 5, 2012

Researchers identify microRNAs that keep cardiac cells healthy after heart attack, potentially paving the way for future heart regenerating therapies.

1 Comment

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