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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

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image: Northern Exposure

Northern Exposure

By | March 1, 2014

Researchers are using snowdrifts to artificially warm Arctic tundra during winter and finding that more carbon is released from the soil than plants can soak up from the atmosphere.


image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.


image: Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

By | February 28, 2014

Researchers suggest that a new prenatal DNA test should become the new standard to detect Down syndrome in fetuses.


image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus


image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.


image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.


image: $1,000 Genome at Last?

$1,000 Genome at Last?

By | January 15, 2014

Illumina says its newest sequencing system can churn out whole human genomes for $1,000 apiece.


image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.


image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.


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