The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and ecology

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image: Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

Virginia Targets Wild Pigs

By | November 26, 2013

The state assembles a task force to try to slow the growth of burgeoning populations of the ecologically destructive invasive species.

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Secret Botulism Paper Published

Secret Botulism Paper Published

By | October 18, 2013

The discovery of a new form of the deadly botulinum toxin gets published, but its sequence is kept under wraps until an antidote is developed.

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image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

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image: Opinion: Standards Needed

Opinion: Standards Needed

By | September 18, 2013

The success of genome sequencing hinges on technology standardization and coordinated efforts among scientists, bioinformaticians, and physicians.

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image: The Price of DNA IDs

The Price of DNA IDs

By | September 16, 2013

Following natural disasters or violent political turmoil, DNA science can help identify victims. But what if a country can’t afford the technology?

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image: Complaints About Government Contest

Complaints About Government Contest

By | July 24, 2013

Contestants criticize the organization and scoring of a Pentagon competition challenging scientists to detect bioterrorism threats by analyzing DNA sequences.

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

image: Bacterial Gene Transfer Gets Sexier

Bacterial Gene Transfer Gets Sexier

By | July 9, 2013

Mycobacterium smegmatis can donate larger portions of its genome to other bacteria than previously thought, approaching the level of gene shuffling seen in sexual reproduction.

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