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image: Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

Plants Communicate with Help of Fungi

By | May 14, 2013

Symbiotic fungi on the roots of bean plants can act as an underground signaling network, transmitting early warnings of impending aphid attacks.  

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image: Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

Arctic Foxes Suffer from Seafood Diet

By | May 9, 2013

The decline of a population of Arctic foxes isolated on a small Russian island may be due to mercury pollution from their diet of seabirds and seals.

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image: Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

Ocean Floor Holds Ancient DNA

By | May 8, 2013

Genetic material recovered from sediment beneath the sea floor reveals ancient species not contained in the fossil record and could shed light on climate change.

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image: Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

By | April 24, 2013

Researchers in the Amazon are measuring how much carbon dioxide fertilizes the rainforest.

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image: Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

Plant DNA Largely Unchanged

By | April 15, 2013

Today’s tulip trees carry similar mitochondrial DNA as those that grew in the time of the dinosaurs.

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image: Sequencing Cancer

Sequencing Cancer

By | April 9, 2013

This month’s AACR attendees, including National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus, discuss new approaches to cancer research using whole genome sequencing.

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image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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image: Revealing Genetic Risks

Revealing Genetic Risks

By | March 22, 2013

Genetics experts argue that patients should be told about dangerous variants in their DNA that show up incidentally during sequencing.

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image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | March 19, 2013

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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