The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and ecology

Most Recent

image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

5 Comments

image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

0 Comments

image: Big Data Problem

Big Data Problem

By | July 8, 2015

Scientists estimate that, in the next 10 years, the data needs of genomics will outpace those of astronomy and some social media.

0 Comments

image: 1 + 1 = 1

1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

0 Comments

image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

0 Comments

image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

0 Comments

image: Telltale Tusks

Telltale Tusks

By | June 22, 2015

Sequencing DNA from ivory may be useful for tracking down elephant poachers.

0 Comments

image: Kennewick Man Was Native American

Kennewick Man Was Native American

By | June 18, 2015

Genomic analysis suggests that the skeleton’s closest living relatives are Native American after all.

3 Comments

image: TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

TS Live: Genetic Time Machine

By | June 12, 2015

Piecing together scraps of DNA from a 400,000-year-old hominin femur

0 Comments

image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Immune Cells Deliver Cancer Drugs to the Brain
AAAS