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image: William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

William Greenleaf: Born for Biophysics

By | June 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Department of Genetics, Stanford University. Age: 35

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image: What’s Old Is New Again

What’s Old Is New Again

By | June 1, 2015

Revolutionary new methods for extracting, purifying, and sequencing ever-more-ancient DNA have opened an unprecedented window into the history of life on Earth.

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | May 21, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Cancer Sequencing Controls

Cancer Sequencing Controls

By | April 15, 2015

Comparing a patient’s tumor DNA sequence with that of her normal tissue can improve researchers’ identification of disease-associated mutations.

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image: Ancestry.com Adds New Genetics Service

Ancestry.com Adds New Genetics Service

By | April 6, 2015

The genealogy company is advertising a new DNA test that can reportedly connect users to their ancestors back to the 1700s.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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