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image: Researchers Hijack a Computer Using DNA Malware

Researchers Hijack a Computer Using DNA Malware

By | August 11, 2017

Malicious code written with nucleic acids could one day threaten sequencing facilities, the team warns.

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image: Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

Pollution Drives Marine Reptile Color Change

By | August 11, 2017

The turtle-headed sea snake is losing its stripes, and researchers suggest that the change reflects adaptation to fouled oceans.

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image: A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain

A Potential Remedy for the Aging Brain

By | August 8, 2017

In mice, injected fragments of a naturally occurring protein boost memory in young and old animals and improve cognition and mobility in a model of neurodegenerative disease. 

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image: Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

Chemogenetics Doesn’t Work Like Many Thought

By | August 4, 2017

A study finds the so-called DREADD method of manipulating neurons using a drug called CNO actually works via clozapine.

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image: Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

Pioneering Neuroscientist Dies

By | July 31, 2017

Marian Diamond, a former University of California, Berkeley, professor, discovered the first evidence for neuroplasticity and studied Einstein’s brain.

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The football league and the government agency part ways over how the money should be used.

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The genomes of two species of water bears reveal clues about how they persist in extreme conditions, yet don’t resolve the animals’ debated evolutionary story.

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image: Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

Stem Cells in the Hypothalamus Slow Aging in Mice

By | July 26, 2017

Once implanted into animals’ brains, neural stem cells that secrete microRNA-containing vesicles seem to contribute to an anti-aging effect.

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A cardiovascular surgeon’s research was rejected for publication because it referenced evolutionary theory, Turkish outlets report, while the university at the center of the tumult claims the story is false. 

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Their waters served as refuges during ice ages, allowing for adaptation and the emergence of new species.

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