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» DNA sequencing, evolution and immunology

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image: Early Evidence

Early Evidence

By | March 1, 2014

Fossilized structures suggest that mat-forming microbes have been around for almost 3.5 billion years.

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image: Keys to the Minibar

Keys to the Minibar

By | March 1, 2014

Degraded DNA from museum specimens, scat, and other sources has thwarted barcoding efforts, but researchers are filling in the gaps with mini-versions of characteristic genomic stretches.

1 Comment

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: The Benefits of Barcoding

The Benefits of Barcoding

By | March 1, 2014

Watch DNA barcoder Mehrdad Hajibabaei from the University of Guelph describe the technology’s potential.

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image: Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

Should Standard Prenatal Screening be Scrapped?

By | February 28, 2014

Researchers suggest that a new prenatal DNA test should become the new standard to detect Down syndrome in fetuses.

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image: Week in Review: February 10–14

Week in Review: February 10–14

By | February 14, 2014

First Ancient North American genome; cannabinoids connect hunger with olfaction and eating; biotechs explore crowdfunding; confronting creationism

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image: Opinion: Confronting Creationism

Opinion: Confronting Creationism

By | February 7, 2014

Five reasons why scientists should stay out of debates over evolution.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

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image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

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image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.

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