The Scientist

» DNA sequencing and evolution

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Their $1.5 billion bid, which topped Thermo Fisher Scientific’s $1.3 billion offer for the genetic analysis company, was rejected.

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Brains Before Brawn

By | March 16, 2016

A newly described horse-size relative of Tyrannosaurus rex may help settle the question of how massive carnivorous dinosaurs took shape throughout the eons.

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image: Less Chewing, More Doing

Less Chewing, More Doing

By | March 11, 2016

Food processing in early hominid populations might have played a key role in human evolution by increasing net energy uptake, researchers show.

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

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Spoiler Alert

By | March 1, 2016

How to store microbiome samples without losing or altering diversity

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Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

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image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

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