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» DNA sequencing and evolution

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image: Winged Dino Found?

Winged Dino Found?

By | May 1, 2015

Researchers describe a small species that may have soared through Jurassic skies on membranous wings like those of bats and flying squirrels.

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Similar Strokes

By | April 29, 2015

Physics drove the convergent evolution of swimming in 22 unrelated marine species, a study suggests.

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Citrus History

By | April 16, 2015

An analysis of 34 chloroplast genomes reveals how and when modern fruit varieties evolved from a common ancestor.

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Cancer Sequencing Controls

By | April 15, 2015

Comparing a patient’s tumor DNA sequence with that of her normal tissue can improve researchers’ identification of disease-associated mutations.

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Behavior Brief

By | April 8, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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Ancestry.com Adds New Genetics Service

By | April 6, 2015

The genealogy company is advertising a new DNA test that can reportedly connect users to their ancestors back to the 1700s.

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Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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Ebola Mutation Rate Quibble

By | March 27, 2015

A study suggests that the virus may not be evolving as quickly as a previous group estimated.

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image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

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image: Oldest <em>Homo</em> Remains Yet Found

Oldest Homo Remains Yet Found

By | March 4, 2015

A newly discovered 2.8 million-year-old jawbone is thought to be that of a direct human ancestor.

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