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image: Genetic Privacy for Suspects?

Genetic Privacy for Suspects?

By | February 12, 2013

In an upcoming hearing, the US Supreme Court will decide on whether police can take DNA samples from suspects who have not been convicted.


image: Solitary Sequencing

Solitary Sequencing

By | December 21, 2012

Decoding the genome of a single cell could reveal previously overlooked levels of genetic variation.


image: 100,000 British Genomes

100,000 British Genomes

By | December 10, 2012

A new initiative lead by the UK’s National Health Service aims to sequence the genomes of as many as 100,000 patients, a project that will cost £100 million.


image: Feds Scrutinize Genomics Merger

Feds Scrutinize Genomics Merger

By | December 6, 2012

A Chinese biotech company is angling to buy California-based Complete Genomics, but federal regulators are expressing security concerns and may scuttle the deal.


image: Top 10 Innovations 2012

Top 10 Innovations 2012

By | December 1, 2012

The Scientist’s 5th installment of its annual competition attracted submissions from across the life science spectrum. Here are the best and brightest products of the year.


image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

1 Comment

image: Searching for Alien Genomes

Searching for Alien Genomes

By | October 22, 2012

J. Craig Venter plans to develop a machine to find and sequence DNA on Mars, but another genomics mogul, Jonathan Rothberg, may beat him to it.


image: BGI Saves Genomics Technology

BGI Saves Genomics Technology

By | September 26, 2012

A large Chinese sequencing center’s purchase of Complete Genomics, a California-based DNA services company, ensures the valued technology will remain on the market.


image: DNA Data Storage

DNA Data Storage

By | August 16, 2012

Researchers code a book into DNA, demonstrating the possibility of using the biological molecule for long-term data storage.


image: Filling in the Missing Letters

Filling in the Missing Letters

By | July 3, 2012

A new algorithm brings together data from second - and third - generation genome sequencers.

1 Comment


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