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image: Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

Making Sense of the Narwhal Tusk

By | March 18, 2014

Emerging evidence suggests that the marine mammal’s long front tooth might help the narwhal sense environmental changes.  

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image: Seeing with Sound

Seeing with Sound

By | March 10, 2014

Converting sights to sounds reveals that the brains of congenitally blind people respond similarly to various objects as those of subjects who can see.

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image: Feeding Frenzy

Feeding Frenzy

By | March 1, 2014

Take a peek into the shark tank where Boston University biologist Jelle Atema is testing how well the fish actually smell.


image: Jaws, Reconsidered

Jaws, Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2014

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.

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image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch


image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.


image: Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

Pruning Synapses Improves Brain Connections

By | February 2, 2014

Without microglia to pluck off unwanted synapses in early life, mouse brains develop with weaker connections, leading to altered social behavior.


image: Feeling Is Believing

Feeling Is Believing

By | February 1, 2014

Many people can “see” their hands in complete darkness, absent any visual stimulus, due to kinesthetic feedback from their own movements.


image: Seeing in the Dark

Seeing in the Dark

By | February 1, 2014

Meet the scientists and study subjects behind research into how senses work together to form perceptions of the world.


image: Shrimp Sight

Shrimp Sight

By | January 24, 2014

Although mantis shrimp eyes have twelve different photoreceptors, the crustaceans have a hard time distinguishing colors, according to a new study.



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