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image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2016 issue of The Scientist

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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image: Hunting with Sharks

Hunting with Sharks

By | September 1, 2016

Watch scenes from research at the University of South Florida's Mote Marine Laboratory, where scientists saw what happened when they knocked out sharks' electroreception.

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image: Katie Kindt's Quest to Understand Hair Cells

Katie Kindt's Quest to Understand Hair Cells

By | September 1, 2016

Acting Chief, Section on Sensory Cell Development and Function, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Age: 38

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image: Mag-Neato!

Mag-Neato!

By | September 1, 2016

Scientists are unraveling how animals use Earth's magnetic field to navigate.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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Neurons in the lamprey spinal cord can sense pH and counteract changes from the body’s optimal range.

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