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image: A Twist of Fate

A Twist of Fate

By | March 1, 2014

Once believed to be irrevocably differentiated, mature cells are now proving to be flexible, able to switch identities with relatively simple manipulation.

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image: Exosome Tentacles

Exosome Tentacles

By | March 1, 2014

Unlike the usual smooth, spherical shape of exosomes, glioblastoma-derived exosomes appear to have long nanofilaments protruding from their surfaces.

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image: Feeding Frenzy

Feeding Frenzy

By | March 1, 2014

Take a peek into the shark tank where Boston University biologist Jelle Atema is testing how well the fish actually smell.

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image: Jaws, Reconsidered

Jaws, Reconsidered

By | March 1, 2014

Biologist Jelle Atema is putting the sensory capabilities of sharks to the test—and finding that the truth is more fascinating than fiction.

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image: Tension Tracker

Tension Tracker

By | March 1, 2014

For the first time, researchers quantify the mechanical forces cells exert on one another.

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image: Making New Spinal Neurons

Making New Spinal Neurons

By | February 25, 2014

With a single gene, scientists reprogram supporting cells in the spines of living mice into new neurons.

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image: Triglyceride Clock

Triglyceride Clock

By | February 10, 2014

The timing of meals affects the levels of lipids in the livers of mice, according to a study.

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image: More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

More Retractions for Fallen Scientist

By | February 7, 2014

Molecular and Cellular Biology pulls five papers from endocrinologist Shigeaki Kato.

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image: Feeling Is Believing

Feeling Is Believing

By | February 1, 2014

Many people can “see” their hands in complete darkness, absent any visual stimulus, due to kinesthetic feedback from their own movements.

3 Comments

image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

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