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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Computers That Can Smell

Computers That Can Smell

By | May 1, 2017

Teams of modelers compete to develop algorithms for estimating how people will perceive a particular odor from its molecular characteristics.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

Understanding Body Ownership and Agency

By | May 1, 2017

Understanding how people recognize and control their own bodies could help researchers develop therapies for those who’ve lost their sense of self.

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Researchers investigate the unusual association of musical sounds with tastes or colors through the lens of another perceptual quirk.

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image: Seal Whiskers Can Detect Weak Water Currents

Seal Whiskers Can Detect Weak Water Currents

By | January 18, 2017

The marine predators may use the mechanosensory hairs to detect fish that are hiding motionless on the seafloor.

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image: Artificial Touch Enabled

Artificial Touch Enabled

By | October 13, 2016

A quadriplegic 28-year-old man senses touch via stimulation of electrodes implanted in his somatosensory cortex.

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image: A Panoply of Animal Senses

A Panoply of Animal Senses

By | September 1, 2016

Animals have receptors for feeling gravity, fluid flow, heat, and electric and magnetic fields.

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image: A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

A Cornucopia of Sensory Perception

By | September 1, 2016

Forget what you learned about humans having five senses. That goes double for non-human animals.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2016 issue of The Scientist

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