The Scientist

» light

Most Recent

image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

0 Comments

image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

1 Comment

image: The Dark Side of Light

The Dark Side of Light

By | May 14, 2015

Artificially extended days cause mice to gain fat and alter the function of their brown fat, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Panic of the Disco Clam

Panic of the Disco Clam

By | January 6, 2015

The mollusk’s flashy tactics scare off predators.

0 Comments

image: Guiding Light

Guiding Light

By | October 1, 2014

Retinal glial cells acting as optical fibers shuttle longer wavelengths of light to individual cones.

0 Comments

image: Bionic Eye Sees the Light

Bionic Eye Sees the Light

By | May 15, 2012

A light-powered retinal implant restores vision in rats.

0 Comments

image: Fighting Cancer with Light

Fighting Cancer with Light

By | November 7, 2011

Researchers have developed a way to activate cancer fighting drugs by pulsing them with light, which could make such therapies safer.

9 Comments

image: Next Generation: World’s Smallest Camera

Next Generation: World’s Smallest Camera

By | July 27, 2011

This lens-free, pinhead-size camera could someday grace the tip of a surgery needle or take cheap 3D images of cells.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case
    Daily News Broad Wins CRISPR Patent Interference Case

    The USPTO’s Patent Trial and Appeal Board has ruled in favor of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard retaining intellectual property rights covered by its patents for CRISPR gene-editing technology.

  2. Henrietta Lacks’s Family Seeks Compensation
  3. Cannibalism: Not That Weird
    Reading Frames Cannibalism: Not That Weird

    Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

  4. Can Plants Learn to Associate Stimuli with Reward?
Business Birmingham