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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 17, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Twists and Turns

Twists and Turns

By | July 17, 2017

New starring roles for nucleic acids

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image: Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

By | July 17, 2017

The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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The new fossils push the origin of the human species back by 100,000 years.

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image: Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

Mammals May Have a 12-Hour Clock

By | June 6, 2017

Data point to peaks in gene expression in the morning and evening that are distinct from day-night circadian cycles.

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image: Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

Mammalian Jaws Evolved to Chew Sideways

By | June 1, 2017

Parallel evolution in jaws and teeth helped early mammals diversify their diets.

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