The Scientist

» DNA nanotechnology

Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 17, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

0 Comments

image: Twists and Turns

Twists and Turns

By | July 17, 2017

New starring roles for nucleic acids

1 Comment

image: Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

Building Nanoscale Structures with DNA

By | July 17, 2017

The versatility of geometric shapes made from the nucleic acid are proving useful in a wide variety of fields from molecular computation to biology to medicine.

0 Comments

image: BIOMOD

BIOMOD

By | July 1, 2015

Scientist to Watch Shawn Douglas explains the annual competition he established to introduce students to molecular programming.

0 Comments

image: A Matter of Size

A Matter of Size

By | August 1, 2014

Erroneous characterization of nanomaterials can misinform the study of a new medicine’s safety and efficacy.

0 Comments

image: Nanomedicine

Nanomedicine

By , , and | August 1, 2014

From bioimaging to drug delivery and therapeutics, nanotechnology is poised to change the way doctors practice medicine.

10 Comments

image: Some Assembly Required

Some Assembly Required

By | September 3, 2013

Researchers construct nanoscale DNA cages that could eventually be used to deliver drugs to target tissues.

0 Comments

image: DNA Machines Inch Forward

DNA Machines Inch Forward

By | March 5, 2013

Researchers are using DNA to compute, power, and sense.

1 Comment

image: Buffering Against Alcohol

Buffering Against Alcohol

By | February 17, 2013

Using a new assembly method, scientists have combined multiple enzymes in a polymer nanocapsule to reduce blood alcohol levels and liver damage in drunken mice.  

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS