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image: WHO: Share Trial Data

WHO: Share Trial Data

By | April 15, 2015

The World Health Organization again calls upon researchers to register clinical trial details in freely accessible databases before initiation of the study.

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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image: Manipulative Microbiomes

Manipulative Microbiomes

By | April 1, 2015

Gut bacteria control tumor growth via the mammalian immune system.

3 Comments

image: Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

By | March 31, 2015

An editor of the journal Scientific Reports quits in protest of paid, expedited review.

4 Comments

image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

Soil Bacteria Live on Wine Grapes

By | March 25, 2015

The earthiness of Merlot may have to do with grapevine-dwelling microbiota.

2 Comments

image: Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

Quorum-Sensing Molecule Modifies Gut Microbiota

By | March 19, 2015

Increasing the abundance of a chemical some microbes use to communicate with one another can help reinstate beneficial bacterial populations in the guts of antibiotic-treated mice. 

1 Comment

image: Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

Sewage Bacteria Linked to Obesity

By | March 10, 2015

Microbes identified in a city’s sewage treatment plants correlate with the population’s obesity rate, a study shows.

1 Comment

image: Judge: PubPeer Users Remain Anonymous

Judge: PubPeer Users Remain Anonymous

By | March 6, 2015

A Michigan judge denies a request to reveal the identities of commenters on the post-publication review website.

2 Comments

image: Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

Nanobombs Terminate Foodborne Microbes

By | March 5, 2015

Researchers engineer water nanostructures to wipe out pathogens that can spoil food and pose health risks.

2 Comments

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