Advertisement
Research!America
Research!America

The Scientist

» peer review and immunology

Most Recent

image: Transplant Without Drugs?

Transplant Without Drugs?

By | March 8, 2012

A new method for transplanting immunologically mismatched organs may remove the need for life-long immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection.

6 Comments

image: How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

How Drugs Interact with a Baby’s Parts

By | March 1, 2012

A lot changes in a child’s body over the course of development, and not all changes occur linearly: gene expression can fluctuate, and organs can perform different functions on the way to their final purpose in the body. Here are some of the key deve

0 Comments

image: Biota Babble

Biota Babble

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

2 Comments

image: Child-Proofing Drugs

Child-Proofing Drugs

By | March 1, 2012

When children need medications, getting the dosing and method of administration right is like trying to hit a moving target with an untried weapon.

6 Comments

image: Skin-Deep Immunity

Skin-Deep Immunity

By | February 29, 2012

Immune cells in skin provide powerful protection against infection, suggesting new routes for vaccination.

6 Comments

image: Switching the Bait

Switching the Bait

By | February 1, 2012

Turning a standard technique into an unbiased screen for diagnostic biomarkers

6 Comments

image: Immune Heat

Immune Heat

By | February 1, 2012

Editor's choice in immunology

3 Comments

image: Resignations Over AIDS Denial

Resignations Over AIDS Denial

By | January 31, 2012

A member of an Italian journal’s editorial board resigns in protest of a paper denying the link between HIV and AIDs.

3 Comments

image: A Peer Review Revolution?

A Peer Review Revolution?

By | January 24, 2012

A new social network provides a novel forum for science publishing and peer review.

9 Comments

image: Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

Arsenic-based Life Challenged Again

By | January 24, 2012

An attempt to regrow the infamous GFAJ-1 bacteria, reported to incorporate arsenic into its DNA backbone, has failed.

9 Comments

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
QIAGEN Ingenuity
QIAGEN Ingenuity

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Biology Research
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
Advertisement