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image: Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

By | September 26, 2016

The “Sentinels of Science” award recognizes especially productive peer reviewers.

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image: Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

By | September 20, 2016

An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.


image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.


image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | September 1, 2016

Sensory discoveries, open-access publishing, and candidates on climate changes

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image: Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

Popular Tumor Cell Line Contaminated

By | August 31, 2016

A commercially available glioblastoma cell line appears to be from a different source than its stated origins.


image: Even More Preprints

Even More Preprints

By | August 17, 2016

A new psychology-centric preprint server is slated to launch.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>Seven Skeletons</em>

Book Excerpt from Seven Skeletons

By | August 1, 2016

In Chapter 1, “The Old Man of La Chapelle: The Patriarch of Paleo,” author Lydia Pyne explains the public's evolving conception of the first complete Neanderthal skeleton found and described by scientists.

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By ditching traditional agar-based media, two biochemists captured iconic images of Myxococcus in 1982.


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