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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

1 Comment

image: Thirty Years of Lab Safety

Thirty Years of Lab Safety

By | October 1, 2016

From mouth pipetting to automated liquid handling, life-science labs have gotten much safer over the past three decades.

1 Comment

image: Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

Does Productivity Diminish Research Quality?

By | September 28, 2016

More papers correlate with top-cited research for more-established academics, but not newly minted professors, according to a study.  

3 Comments

image: Study: Peer Reviewers Swayed by Prestige

Study: Peer Reviewers Swayed by Prestige

By | September 27, 2016

Evaluators of mock submissions to an orthopedic surgery journal were more likely to recommend the publication of a manuscript from distinguished authors than one from anonymous ones.

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image: TS Picks: September 26, 2016

TS Picks: September 26, 2016

By | September 27, 2016

World leaders agree to fight superbugs; researchers edit human embryos; peer reviewers’ motivations

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image: Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

Most Active Peer Reviewers Honored

By | September 26, 2016

The “Sentinels of Science” award recognizes especially productive peer reviewers.

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image: Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

By | September 20, 2016

An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

2 Comments

image: This is Your Brain on Art

This is Your Brain on Art

By | September 1, 2016

Nobel Laureate Eric Kandel talks about how our brains perceive and understand works of art.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

1 Comment

image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

0 Comments

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