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image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

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image: The Year in Science Publishing

The Year in Science Publishing

By | December 30, 2013

From the launch of preprint servers and post-publication peer review platforms to shakeups within the open-access movement, science publishing saw much change in 2013.

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image: Speaking of Cell Biology

Speaking of Cell Biology

By | December 17, 2013

A selection of notable quotes from the annual American Society for Cell Biology meeting.

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image: Preprints Galore

Preprints Galore

By | November 12, 2013

The research community sees the launch of a new life science-centric preprint server this week.

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image: Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

Thomas Gregor: Biological Quantifier

By | November 1, 2013

Assistant Professor, Physics, Princeton University. Age: 39

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image: About Face

About Face

By | October 25, 2013

Researchers show that genetic enhancer elements likely contribute to face shape in mice.

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image: Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

By | October 22, 2013

The launch of PubMed Commons highlights the pros and cons of re-reviewing published papers. 

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image: Useless Peer Review?

Useless Peer Review?

By | October 15, 2013

A study shows that the methods by which scientists evaluate each other’s work are error-prone and poor at measuring merit.

3 Comments

image: Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

By | October 6, 2013

The widespread acceptance of an atrocious manuscript, fabricated by an investigative journalist, reveals the near absence of quality at some journals.

2 Comments

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